Biden Plugs ‘A New Health Insurance Option,’ Expanded Medicaid/Medicare

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at a drive-in rally in Miramar, Florida on October 13, 2020. (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

(CNSNews.com) – Democrat Joe Biden and his fellow Democrats rail against President Trump and Republicans for wanting to get rid of the Affordable Care Act, with its high premiums and co-pays and limited options for millions of Americans.

But even Biden isn’t satisfied with the law as it now stands.

At a campaign stop in Miramar, Florida on Tuesday, Biden urged a larger role for government in Americans’ health insurance coverage, including bigger subsidies and expanded Medicaid/Medicare:

“Together, we’ll build on the Affordable Care Act by adding–by adding a new health insurance option, a not-for-profit option, to give private insurers a real competitor,” Biden said.

“We’ll increase (government) subsidies so premiums are lower cost to get more coverage, lower deductibles, lower out-of-pocket expenses.

“And by the

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Supreme Court nominee Barrett says personal views will not impact her decisions on abortion, health care

President Trump’s third nominee to the Supreme Court declined to answer some questions that seemed steeped in basic facts, such as whether a president has the power under the Constitution to unilaterally delay an election. Barrett also declined to say whether she would recuse herself from a potential 2020 election case as Senate Democrats demanded, saying she would not be “used as a pawn to decide the election for the American people.”

Like high court nominees who preceded her, Barrett repeatedly avoided weighing in on her personal views of landmark decisions and declined to say whether she endorsed opinions from her mentor, former Justice Antonin Scalia, on abortion and same-sex marriage. At the same time, under hours of questioning from members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, she reinforced perceptions that she would help solidify a 6-to-3 conservative majority on the Supreme Court.

On the Affordable Care Act, whose constitutionality will

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How we can help the unemployed keep their health insurance

Keith Prisco is a stagehand at the United Center in Chicago and a proud union member of IATSE Local 2. Like tens of millions of Americans, he receives health insurance through his employer for himself and his family. The security of this coverage is even more important for Keith after he was diagnosed with leukemia four years ago. But when COVID-19 put a screeching halt on live events, that meant Keith was out of work — jeopardizing his health care coverage in the middle of a pandemic.

As COVID-19 continues to threaten the health and safety of Americans, millions of workers have found themselves under threat of losing their jobs, their health coverage, and their financial savings — all through no fault of their own.

It is unconscionable that unemployed or furloughed workers could also lose health coverage during a public health crisis, yet there are an estimated 10 to

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Tips for Navigating Medical Care Without Health Insurance

Millions of people in the U.S. live without health insurance, a circumstance that can cause people to weigh the need to see a doctor against the cost. Unfortunately, many people will put off or do without medical care because they can’t afford it, a decision that could jeopardize their health.

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While the Affordable Care Act has boosted the number of Americans with insurance, millions remain uninsured. In 2018, 27.5 million people – more than 8% of the U.S. population – were uninsured, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Private health insurance covered 67% of Americans. Those without health coverage face the dilemma: Where can I go for medical care without insurance?

The Coverage Gap

In addition to the people who are uninsured, millions are underinsured, according to a survey by the Commonwealth Fund. Among people with health insurance, 29% were underinsured in 2018, compared to 23% in 2014,

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We Like Our Health Insurance And Working From Home

Jan Dubauskas is the Vice President of Healthinsurance.com.

We have experienced a lot of change throughout the course of the pandemic that has required us to reconsider our priorities and become nimble in the way we work and how we reach out to our clients. Many were skeptical that these changes would lead to similar productivity. However, as we prioritize our health during the pandemic, working from home has become important, and many (24%, according to CNBC) have adapted so well that they want to keep doing it.

When we first started working from home, the primary concern for many was to set up an office, retain camaraderie, and continue meeting with clients. During the spring, as I watched as annual springtime conferences got canceled or sent to an online format, I keenly felt the void previously filled by those intense social interactions. It seemed that with a bit

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Whitney Way Thore Opens Up About Her Mental Health After Year of ‘Profound Personal Loss’

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Whitney Way Thore

Whitney Way Thore is reflecting on her mental health struggles.

In honor of World Mental Health Day, the My Big Fat Fabulous Life star, 36, reflected on the “profound personal loss” she experienced this year, which included splitting from fiancé Chase Severino after learning he was expecting a child with another woman.

“Hey y’all. It’s #worldmentalhealthday and I just want to remind you that if you’re struggling, you’re not alone,” she wrote at the start of the candid post. “I was diagnosed with depression at 18 and have been dealing with it for more than 20 years. I’ve also been diagnosed with atypical anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and generalized anxiety disorder.”

“2020 has been chaotic, terrifying, divisive, and disheartening. Even the most positive people with no history of mental health issues have probably felt hopeless, helpless, and like things are bleak,” she continued. “If

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Your health insurance might be on the chopping block

Too bad there is not another presidential debate this week. The moderator would be able to ask the most important question of our time: When it comes to a comprehensive health insurance program, which is better: ObamaCare or what the Trump administration has proposed to replace it with? 

It’s a trick question, because to date, after four years of promising a better health insurance plan, there is no Trump administration plan.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), better known as ObamaCare, which passed in 2010, extended coverage to millions of uninsured Americans by expanding Medicaid. Thirty-nine states have since elected to expand eligibility. For others not covered by their employer’s plan, new health insurance exchanges were created to allow individuals to buy health insurance.

Additionally, the ACA set federal standards for health insurers that offer plans to individuals, small groups as well as employer-sponsored health benefit plans.  For the first time,

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Americans need to separate health insurance from our jobs

If we want to radically improve insurance and health care in our country to ensure that every American receives the care they need, we have to be bold. And that begins with divorcing insurance from where we work.



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Not only would that improve the choices of consumers, but it would also help lower costs and provide more options for people who aren’t covered in the current system. That would empower individuals to choose their health plans according to their needs.

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As of March 2019, the U.S. Census estimates that 91% of the population had health insurance. Nearly one third receive coverage from government health insurance, whether Medicare, Medicaid or state employees. Left out are approximately 29.9 million Americans without health insurance — public, private or otherwise.

The number of uninsured is an important metric because it is the target group for

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More children lack health insurance

A record 4.4. million children were without health insurance last year, an increase by about 320,000, an analysis of Census data shows.

Why it matters: After decades of decline, it’s the third year in a row the nation has seen an increase in the number of uninsured children.

  • The numbers were recorded during steady economic growth — before the coronavirus and record unemployment.

The big picture: The number of uninsured children began to increase in 2017 as Medicaid and CHIP enrollment began to decline, the analysis from the Georgetown Center for Children and Families shows.

By the numbers: Twenty-nine states experienced growing uninsured rates among children from 2016-2019, with Texas accounting for more than one-third of uninsured children during this time period.

  • New York was the only state that had a significant improvement in uninsured children from 2016-2019.

What to watch: About 300,000 more children may be uninsured by the

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Even as the Economy Grew, More Children Lost Health Insurance

The share of children with health coverage in the United States fell for the third consecutive year in 2019, according to census data, after decades of increases.

The decline occurred during a period of economic growth — before the coronavirus pandemic caused broad job losses that might have cost many more Americans their health insurance.

A report Friday by the Georgetown Center for Children and Families found that the ranks of uninsured children grew the most in Texas and Florida, and that Latino children were disproportionately affected. Nationally, the number of children without health insurance rose by 320,000 last year alone, to a total of nearly 4.4 million children, the report found.

“What’s so troubling about this data is we were making so much progress as a country,” said Joan Alker, the center’s executive director and an author of the report. “And now that progress is clearly reversing.”

The picture

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