Americans are ‘panic buying’ life insurance due to coronavirus pandemic

  • Many firms have noted double-digit increases in the number of life insurance policies they’ve sold during the Covid-19 pandemic relative to last year. 
  • The increase is largely due to a fear of death and greater awareness of financial risks associated with mortality, experts said.
  • Insurance sales have been dwindling for years. In 2020, just over half of American adults reported having a life insurance policy, down from 63% a decade earlier.





© Provided by CNBC


Life insurance is enjoying something of a renaissance as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Consumers, especially younger adults, have been buying insurance in elevated numbers since the spring, when thousands of Americans began getting ill and dying from Covid-19.

That result is logical, experts said, given the core use of life insurance: as a financial backstop in the event of death.

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Life insurance sales increase due to coronavirus pandemic

shapecharge | E+ | Getty Images

Life insurance is enjoying something of a renaissance as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Consumers, especially younger adults, have been buying insurance in elevated numbers since the spring, when thousands of Americans began getting ill and dying from Covid-19.

That result is logical, experts said, given the core use of life insurance: as a financial backstop in the event of death.

More from Smart Tax Planning:
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For example, what if the breadwinner of a family dies unexpectedly from Covid-19? Insurance is meant to plug that immediate gap in household income.

“It’s forced the idea of financial protection and mortality to the top of mind for consumers in a way very few

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Will individuals see the savings from insurance pandemic relief? Not quite

Health insurance companies are offering their corporate customers rebates to offset premium costs and reflect lower medical spending as patients avoid doctors’ offices, routine procedures and elective surgeries during the coronavirus pandemic.



a person sitting at a desk: ACA Health Experts call center expert, Cynthia Hernandez helps Tiffany Wright get health insurance at the Ahmed and Roshan Virani Children's Clinic, Monday,Nov. 14, 2016 in Houston. It’s likely that 2021 health insurance premiums will remain around the same prices as 2020, experts said.


© Karen Warren, Staff Photographer / Houston Chronicle

ACA Health Experts call center expert, Cynthia Hernandez helps Tiffany Wright get health insurance at the Ahmed and Roshan Virani Children’s Clinic, Monday,Nov. 14, 2016 in Houston. It’s likely that 2021 health insurance premiums will remain around the same prices as 2020, experts said.


It’s unclear how big an impact the rebates, in the form of credits, might have on the premiums companies pay and contributions their employees make. Premiums vary from company to company and, depending on the circumstances, the rebates could lower premiums, keep them from rising or at least limit increases.

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Companies, meanwhile, will decide whether to adjust employee contributions to health insurance premiums based

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Rocked By Pandemic, Global Supply Chains Reboot

Ten million parts went into the 30,000 ventilators that General Motors
GM
, in partnership with Ventec Life Systems, delivered to the national stockpile earlier this year. Thousands of employees at 90 companies helped make the parts.

From the moment in mid-March that GM and Ventec first discussed their alliance to ramp up production of Ventec’s VOCSN critical care ventilators, the project moved quickly, as the severity of the coronavirus – and of equipment shortages – became more apparent with each passing day. Right away, the joint venture hit a hurdle: factories in India that manufactured crucial VOCSN parts were shut down because of the pandemic.

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Life Insurance Customer Satisfaction Flatlines Despite Pandemic Fears, J.D. Power Finds

State Farm Ranks Highest in Individual Life Insurance; Nationwide, New York Life Tie for Highest in Annuity

Even as deaths associated with COVID-19 eclipse 200,000 in the United States, consumers don’t seem motivated to buy life insurance and life insurance customers are largely apathetic toward their insurer despite some standout performances. According to the J.D. Power 2020 U.S. Life Insurance Study,SM released today, a combination of infrequent client communications and a pervasive perception of high cost and transaction complexity have suppressed consumer interest and customer satisfaction with life insurance providers.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005142/en/

J.D. Power 2020 U.S. Life Insurance Study (Graphic: Business Wire)

“The life insurance industry has a significant perception problem because, in the throes of a pandemic, consumers naturally should be more engaged with their insurer—but they aren’t,” said Robert M. Lajdziak, senior consultant of insurance intelligence at J.D.

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The consultants in high demand during the pandemic and their salaries

  • The management consulting market declined by $30 billion due to decreased client demand during the coronavirus pandemic, but certain areas are still growing. 
  • Experts told Business Insider that technology, healthcare, and strategy consulting remain steady areas of growth for major firms like KPMG, McKinsey, and Boston Consulting Group.
  • Consultants with specializations in digital transformation, corporate turnarounds, and cybersecurity are in higher demand right now. 
  • Here are the practice areas that will expand in response to the coronavirus and how much they pay. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

If you’re looking for a job in management consulting right now, it pays to be in a booming sector. 

The coronavirus pandemic has upended the management-consulting industry. The market for consultants has declined this year to an estimated $132 billion from $160 billion because of decreased client demand, according to research platform Statista. The crisis put a strain on corporate budgets,

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D-FW sees boom in industrial in face of pandemic

Fueled by increased consumer product demands during the pandemic, Dallas-Fort Worth industrial building leasing set a record in the first nine months of 2020.

Warehouse and distribution tenants have gobbled up 21 million square feet of industrial space in North Texas through September.

Almost 5 million square feet of net leasing was recorded just in the third quarter, according to a new report from commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield.

“The Dallas-Fort Worth industrial market continues to perform extremely well,” Cushman & Wakefield executive managing director Nathan Orbin said. “Even as concerns over the pandemic and an upcoming presidential election exist, demand remained strong,

“We anticipate demand to remain elevated as we are currently tracking over 14 million square feet of active tenant requirements.”

Expanding e-commerce and consumer products firms are driving the demand for North Texas warehouse space.

In the third quarter, some of the biggest leases were

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Underground insulin exchanges emerge as workers lose jobs amid pandemic, insurance co-pays fall short

DENVER — D.j. Mattern had her Type 1 diabetes under control until COVID-19’s economic upheaval cost her husband his hotel maintenance job and their health coverage. The 42-year-old Denver woman suddenly faced insulin’s exorbitant list price — anywhere from $125 to $450 per vial — just as their household income shrank.

She scrounged extra insulin from friends, and her doctor gave her a couple of samples. But, as she rationed her supplies, her blood sugar rose so high that her glucose monitor couldn’t even register a number. In June, she was hospitalized.

“My blood was too acidic. My system was shutting down. My digestive tract was paralyzed,” Mattern said, after three weeks in the hospital. “I was almost near death.”

So she turned to a growing underground network of people with diabetes who share extra insulin when they have it, free of charge. It wasn’t supposed to be this way,

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Japan bank lending slows as easing pandemic sees big firms pay back loans

* Bank lending rises 6.4% in September vs 6.7% in August

* Major banks’ lending slows as big firms pay back loans

* Smaller borrowers continue to rely heavily on lending

(Adds details, quotes from BOJ briefing)

By Chris Gallagher and Leika Kihara

TOKYO, Oct 12 – Japanese bank lending rose at a slower
annual pace in September than the previous month as corporate
funding strains caused by the pandemic eased mainly among big
borrowers, central bank data showed on Monday.

But lending by regional banks remained high as smaller firms
continued to borrow heavily to meet immediate funding needs, the
data showed, underscoring the lingering economic pain brought by
the health crisis.

“Big companies that had borrowed huge amounts of funds as a
precaution around spring are now paying back some of the loans
due to easing uncertainty over the pandemic,” a BOJ official
told a briefing.

“But that’s

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FCA Imposes Just Four Fines as Pandemic Disrupts Investigations

(Bloomberg) — The U.K.’s financial regulator imposed just four fines so far this year — a record low — as the Covid-19 pandemic interrupted investigations.



a clock tower in the middle of a city at night: Businessmen pass an illuminated clock near the offices of global financial institutions in the Canary Wharf business, finance and shopping district at night in London.


© Bloomberg
Businessmen pass an illuminated clock near the offices of global financial institutions in the Canary Wharf business, finance and shopping district at night in London.

While the Financial Conduct Authority has levied more than 100 million pounds ($129 million) in financial penalties, the number of fines was down from 17 in the same period a year earlier, London law firm RPC said in a statement. The FCA’s investigations were likely hindered by difficulties conducting interviews with witnesses or suspects during the lockdown, the firm said.

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“While the FCA has issued relatively few fines in the last few months, it will want to make up for time lost during lockdown when it will, understandably, have experienced disruption and delay in a number

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