Le’Veon Bell got lots of money from Jets for little work, but still sold himself short

If the goal was to obtain the most amount of money in exchange for the least amount of football, then certainly Le’Veon Bell scored big.

When he was released Tuesday by the Jets — the organization declaring it was “in the interest of both parties” — he had received $28,031,250 in exchange for 17 games, 264 carries, 69 receptions, four touchdowns and 1,363 net yards gained.

You may divide any of those football statistics into his exorbitant paycheck and get a staggering quotient. For instance: $20,565.84 per yard. That 2-yard run on the Jets’ second play from scrimmage in Sunday’s ludicrous 30-10 loss to the Cardinals’? That was $41,131.69 right there.

Cha-ching.

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If the goal was to be a successful professional football player and maximize his earning potential as well as his athletic accomplishments, however, no one should pretend Bell did

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The CEO of the world’s largest wealth manager says stocks have more upside ahead and most investors should put more money to work


  • BlackRock CEO Larry Fink told CNBC on Tuesday stocks have more upside ahead and most investors should put more money to work in the market.
  • “I believe we still have more to go on the upside even in front of probably rising infection rates with COVID-19,” Fink said. 
  • With interest rates lower for longer and the likelihood of a second fiscal stimulus, Fink expects the market to move higher.

BlackRock CEO Larry Fink told CNBC on Tuesday that stocks have more upside ahead and investors should put more money to work in the market. 

“We have a strong conviction that the average investor still is under-invested and they’re going to have to be putting more and more money to work over the coming months and maybe even years,” Fink said. “I believe we still have more to go on the upside even in front of probably rising

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Oil Explorers Get Back to Work After Delta Rakes Louisiana

(Bloomberg) — Oil explorers, tugboat operators and other U.S. Gulf Coast businesses got back to work on Saturday after the region was slammed by its second hurricane in six weeks.



a train on a steel track: Oil tanker rail cars parked at the Motiva Port Arthur refinery ahead of Hurricane Delta in Port Arthur, Texas, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 9, 2020. Delta churned toward the U.S. Gulf Coast, packing a deadly storm surge and winds strong enough to damage well-built homes as it neared an area of Louisiana still recovering from Hurricane Laura.


© Bloomberg
Oil tanker rail cars parked at the Motiva Port Arthur refinery ahead of Hurricane Delta in Port Arthur, Texas, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 9, 2020. Delta churned toward the U.S. Gulf Coast, packing a deadly storm surge and winds strong enough to damage well-built homes as it neared an area of Louisiana still recovering from Hurricane Laura.

Hundreds of thousands of residents in southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas were without power almost 24 hours after Hurricane Delta roared ashore near the tiny coastal hamlet of Creole, Louisiana, late Friday.

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Bristow Group Inc., which transports offshore crews to and from oil platforms and drilling ships by helicopter, had already returned 50 or 60 workers to various Gulf

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Japan’s Mizuho to introduce shorter work week in response to coronavirus

TOKYO, Oct 7 (Reuters)The chief executive of Japan’s Mizuho Financial Group Inc 8411.T aims to give employees the option of a shorter working week as it seeks to boost flexibility during the coronavirus pandemic, a company spokeswoman said on Wednesday.

Chief Executive Officer Tatsufumi Sakai made the comments on Tuesday at a symposium organized by the Nikkei, she said.

Mizuho, Japan’s third-largest lender by assets, will give about 45,000 employees the option to work three or four days a week, the spokeswoman said. It aims to make the option available from December after holding talks with its labour union.

It comes as firms in Japan, known for a strong work ethic and long working hours, have sought to give employees more flexibility during the pandemic, according to a Reuters poll in August.

“We are strengthening the system (for flexible working) so that employees will be able to work

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how does it work and who is eligible?

Video: Budget to shift government COVID-19 strategy from ‘job retainment to job creation’ (Sky News Australia)

Budget to shift government COVID-19 strategy from ‘job retainment to job creation’

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The Coalition has announced a wage credit worth up to $200 a week per employee if businesses hire young people.



a man standing on a table: Photograph: Lukas Coch/AAP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Lukas Coch/AAP

The jobmaker hiring credit will cost $4bn over three years to support the employment of 450,000 people aged 35 and younger.

The measure was welcomed by employers but there are already concerns about what an incentive to hire one cohort of people at risk of unemployment will do to others who miss out.



a man standing on a table: The jobmaker hiring credit announced in the budget is worth up to $200 a week for each employee.


© Photograph: Lukas Coch/AAP
The jobmaker hiring credit announced in the budget is worth up to $200 a week for each employee.

Why do it?

Youth unemployment is now 14.3%, more than double the general rate

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INSIGHT-“Work from work:” How a U.S. energy firm’s office return left some employees bruised

By Liz Hampton and Erwin Seba

HOUSTON, Oct 6 (Reuters)As the world experimented with working from home, U.S. energy firm Phillips 66 Co PSX.N went the other way: it imposed a “work-from-work” policy for staff at its Houston headquarters in May even as the city became a hot spot for the pandemic.

After a brief spike in COVID-19 cases in July, Phillips 66 avoided a major outbreak while remaining nearly fully staffed at its 1.1 million-square-foot Houston campus. The policy also put the company’s white-collar workers on the same footing as refinery staff who were unable to work from home due to the nature of their jobs. Phillips 66 told its employees it hoped to pioneer a safe return to the office that would encourage others to do the same and drive a recovery in demand for gasoline, the company’s main product.

But the decision by the

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UK Launches Scheme to Help New COVID Jobless Back Into Work | Investing News

LONDON (Reuters) – The British government launched a new employment programme on Monday aimed at helping those left jobless due to the COVID-19 pandemic to get back into work.

The Department for Work and Pensions said the Job Entry Targeted Support (JETS) scheme would be backed by a 238 million pound ($308 million) investment.

The ministry said jobseekers put forward for the scheme would have access to tailored, flexible support to quickly get back into employment. This could involve specialist advice on how people could move into growing sectors, as well as coaching on CVs and interviews.

“JETS will give recently unemployed people the helping hand they need to get back into work, boosting the prospects of more than a quarter of a million people across Britain,” said Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Therese Coffey.

A government subsidy scheme for workers on furlough is due to expire on

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A welder who’s been out of work since February shares his story



Dodd (not pictured) has been out of work since February. Juan Silva/Getty Images


© Provided by Business Insider
Dodd (not pictured) has been out of work since February. Juan Silva/Getty Images

  • Garrett Dodd is a 22-year-old welder in the North Dakota oil fields based in Watford City, North Dakota.
  • He’s been unemployed since February.
  • In the meantime, he’s started doing photography and media production, but he says he’s not done with welding just yet.
  • This is his story, as told to Will Meyer.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

I moved to Watford City, North Dakota, from Fort Worth, Texas, in 2017. 

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I was part of a very active welding program in high school, and I had a really good teacher who got me interested in it. I started welding right out of high school. I worked for a city for a little while; I thought that’s where I was going to retire at one point in time. And thankfully

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South African coffin-maker saw COVID-19 at work and at home

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A worker constructs coffins at Enzo Wood Designs, in Johannesburg, Wednesday, Sept. 30. 2020. Casey Pillay, a coffin-maker in South Africa, watched the coronavirus pandemic turn his business upside down. For Pillay, the need for coffins rose and fell as South Africa’s lockdown levels changed, but overall, he said, “business went down.” As the world surpasses 1 million deaths, Africa is bracing for a likely second wave of infections.

AP

The coffin-maker knew death too well. The boxes were stacked in his echoing workshop like the prows of ships waiting for passengers. COVID-19 was turning his business upside down.

Then it moved into his home.

Casey Pillay’s wife was a midwife, delivering babies for coronavirus-positive mothers in Johannesburg, the epicenter of the pandemic in South Africa — once fifth in the world in number of cases — and on the continent.

That she would be infected, they

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Black Lives Matter mask policies at work raise legal questions

  • Workers at chains including Whataburger, Ralphs, and Whole Foods are fighting for their right to wear Black Lives Matter masks and other gear on the job. 
  • Employers have the right to create dress codes that prevent workers from wearing clothing with any sort of messaging, according to employment and discrimination attorney Wendy Greene. 
  • However, if these policies are not regularly enforced, employers could be subject to discrimination claims. 
  • “Even though generally, employers are within their legal rights to bar employees from wearing ‘Black Lives Matter’ masks and shirts, employers should shift the focus from whether I can legally do so to should I do so?” Greene said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Workers are fighting for their right to wear Black Lives Matter gear on the job. But, can they win in court? 

Last week, Ma’Kiya Congious filed a complaint with Texas officials against Whataburger, saying the burger

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